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HR to Go Latest Newsletter and FAQ

Read our current newsletter as well as past newsletters we've published for interesting and helpful articles to share.
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Helpful HR Articles

Get the latest on legislation passed for the current year as well as what's occurred over the past few years plus helpful articles and hints on Safety and OSHA matters.
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Upcoming Training

HR to Go hosts a series of training seminars in 2016 to bring you the knowledge and skills you need to manage your employees effectively. Courses are offered to a limited number of participants. Seating is limited so register today!

Click here for a list of upcoming training seminars.

Location: Midtown
1730 I Street, Suite 240
Sacramento, CA 95811
Time: 9:00am - 10:30am
Continental breakfast will be served.

To reserve your spot call 916.444.6200 or email us at info@hrtogo.com.

How to Entice Employees Through Workload Crunches

motivating-your-employeesYour staff is overworked, and if you don’t do something about it now, you’re going to start losing some of your best people. Here’s what you can do immediately to turn the situation around:

  • Be the one to bring it up. Make certain your people know that you recognize how hard they’re working. Some managers actually believe that if they don’t talk about it, employees won’t notice it. Wrong! They’ll notice the extra workload – and resent you and the company for not addressing it.
  • Explain the reasons behind the increased workload. Often, employees will put up with being overworked as long as they understand why it is happening – a push to beat a competitor to market, for example.
  • Give them extra resources. Ask employees what you can do to help them survive the rush. Do they have the equipment they need? Would hiring interns or temps help? If employees think you’re sincere about helping them get through the work onslaught, they won’t entertain thoughts of leaving the company the first chance they get.
  • Drop low-priority projects. Do anything you can to relieve the pressure. Are there projects you can drop – or at least put on hold until the staff has more time to handle them? Cut as much as you can, so employees can focus on high-priority jobs.